The Office of
Planned Giving

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1-401-863-9119

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1-401-863-3301

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Planned_Giving@brown.edu

Sierra J. Rosen
Executive Director
T 1-401-863-3563

Carole Johnston
Trusts & Estates Manager
T 1-401-863-1221

Lisa Logan Ross
Associate
T 1-401-863-9119

Meet Brown’s Supporters

Never Too Young to Give Back

Jason Klein

Jason Klein ’00 knows the value of a Brown education and the doors it can open. He started medical school with plans to become a doctor but took a year off to work at an online retail music company founded by two 1996 Brown graduates. That decision changed his career path, and he credits Brown with giving him the courage to take a different route. Read more


A Brown Love Story

Pollards

We met in the John Hay Library. I saw a cute girl studying Spenser and sat down across from her. When the Carrie Tower chimed noon, I said, "Do you want to go out and get a frappe?" She said, "Sure." And that was it.

Jeannette and I have been married for 65 years. During that time, three of our daughters, four grandchildren and several of their spouses have also graduated from Brown. My wife and I try to help out whenever we can.”  Read more


Norm James ’53

Norm James

The inspiration to give comes in many forms. For Norman “Jesse” James ’53, it came in the form of class pride, lifelong friendships, and a desire to establish a legacy on College Hill.

Norm, whose support of Brown includes a bequest in his will designated to the Class of 1953 Endowed Scholarship Fund, is pleased to “further (his) legacy to the University.”  Read more


Roger Feldman ’60 P’83 GP ’15 GP ’17

Roger Feldman

The Feldman family has a long legacy at Brown, with many family members having attended. “Brown’s been very good for me and for my family. My son Hadley went on to a successful law career and is a fine human being.” His granddaughter Perry ’15 “gained a broader perspective and a yearning to be meaningfully involved. She understands that a good life is more than just a good job. Read more


Art Hirst ’57

Art Hirst

When Art Hirst ’57 decided to retire, he and his wife, Barb, established a charitable remainder unitrust (CRUT) at Brown.

Each year, Art and Barb make additional charitable contributions to their trust. Currently, they receive an annual payment from the trust. Read more


Support for Undergraduate Scholarships

Newell Morton

Newell Morton '32 committed his life to leading and influencing others behind the scenes, without publicity and without recognition. I have found myself becoming more and more proud of his accomplishments as a teacher, coach, and community volunteer. He loved Brown University, and, without recognition of any kind, he introduced Brown to many young people in our town of Reading, Massachusetts. He made it possible for me and for others to enter Brown and for even more to attain an appreciation for the solid values of our society as reflected by Brown University. My gift honors Newt’s legacy and will support Brown scholars for generations to come.

»  Anonymous Donor

The Newell H. Morton A. B. 1932 Scholarship was established through a current-use gift and a bequest to Brown University by an alumnus who wishes to remain anonymous.


Support for the Faculty

Seaver

The Seaver Chair is a milestone for me and the University . . . The gift of the Adele Kellenberg Seaver '49 bequest will enable us to further deepen our commitment to developing some of the most exciting and diverse new voices in contemporary playwriting . . . and help us continue to build a growing national circle of theatre artists who were nurtured here at Brown University . . . I am honored to bear her name.

»  Paula Vogel, Adele Kellenberg Seaver '49 Professor of Creative Writing

The Adele Kellenberg Seaver '49 Professorship in Creative Writing was established with a testamentary gift.


A charitable bequest is one or two sentences in your will or living trust that leave to Brown University a specific item, an amount of money, a gift contingent upon certain events or a percentage of your estate.

an individual or organization designated to receive benefits or funds under a will or other contract, such as an insurance policy, trust or retirement plan

"I, [name], of [city, state, ZIP], give, devise and bequeath to Brown University [written amount or percentage of the estate or description of property] for its unrestricted use and purpose."

able to be changed or cancelled

A revocable living trust is set up during your lifetime and can be revoked at any time before death. They allow assets held in the trust to pass directly to beneficiaries without probate court proceedings and can also reduce federal estate taxes.

cannot be changed or cancelled

tax on gifts generally paid by the person making the gift rather than the recipient

the original value of an asset, such as stock, before its appreciation or depreciation

the growth in value of an asset like stock or real estate since the original purchase

the price a willing buyer and willing seller can agree on

The person receiving the gift annuity payments.

the part of an estate left after debts, taxes and specific bequests have been paid

a written and properly witnessed legal change to a will

the person named in a will to manage the estate, collect the property, pay any debt, and distribute property according to the will

A donor advised fund is an account that you set up but which is managed by a nonprofit organization. You contribute to the account, which grows tax-free. You can recommend how much (and how often) you want to distribute money from that fund to Brown or other charities. You cannot direct the gifts.

An endowed gift can create a new endowment or add to an existing endowment. The principal of the endowment is invested and a portion of the principal’s earnings are used each year to support our mission.

Tax on the growth in value of an asset—such as real estate or stock—since its original purchase.

Securities, real estate, or any other property having a fair market value greater than its original purchase price.

Real estate can be a personal residence, vacation home, timeshare property, farm, commercial property or undeveloped land.

A charitable remainder trust provides you or other named individuals income each year for life or a period not exceeding 20 years from assets you give to the trust you create.

You give assets to a trust that pays our organization set payments for a number of years, which you choose. The longer the length of time, the better the gift tax savings to you. When the term is up, the remaining trust assets go to you, your family or other beneficiaries you select. This is an excellent way to transfer property to family members at a minimal cost.

You fund this type of trust with cash or appreciated assets—and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. You can also make additional gifts; each one also qualifies for a tax deduction. The trust pays you, each year, a variable amount based on a fixed percentage of the fair market value of the trust assets. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Brown as a lump sum.

You fund this trust with cash or appreciated assets—and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. Each year the trust pays you or another named individual the same dollar amount you choose at the start. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to Brown as a lump sum.

A beneficiary designation clearly identifies how specific assets will be distributed after your death.

A charitable gift annuity involves a simple contract between you and Brown where you agree to make a gift to Brown and we, in return, agree to pay you (and someone else, if you choose) a fixed amount each year for the rest of your life.

Personal Estate Planning Kit Request Form

Please provide the following information to view the materials for planning your estate.

eBrochure Request Form

Please provide the following information to view the brochure.